Author Topic: Condenser Microphones & What Mic do you use?  (Read 1678 times)

Offline Lestan Gregor

  • PLA Bitch
  • *****
  • Posts: 746
  • 1337 13V3L: +64/-30
Condenser Microphones & What Mic do you use?
« on: August 18, 2008, 10:42:15 PM »
Hearing PLA Radio, and the recordings on the front page got me to thinking about different microphones and condenser mics. So here's a few questions:

1. RBCP, What mike do you use?
2. Matt, same question and also: What would you recommend condenser wise?
3. What does everybody else use/recommend?

I would be using it for recording vocals....

Offline rbcp

  • Head Custodian
  • Administrator
  • Ninja Phone Loser
  • *****
  • Posts: 5259
  • 1337 13V3L: +454/-81
  • I'm not stupid! I'm not stupid! Hematology!
    • Homepage
Re: Condenser Microphones & What Mic do you use?
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2008, 02:45:47 AM »
Hearing PLA Radio, and the recordings on the front page got me to thinking about different microphones and condenser mics. So here's a few questions:

1. RBCP, What mike do you use?
2. Matt, same question and also: What would you recommend condenser wise?
3. What does everybody else use/recommend?

I would be using it for recording vocals....

For most of the PLA Radios I've been using a crappy old karaoke dynamic microphone.  I think I got it for under $20.  Earlier this year I decided that I'd been doing PLA Radio long enough that maybe I should think about getting a real microphone, so I bought a CAD GXL2200 Condenser Microphone.  It's nice and I think it sounds a little better, but it picks up every little noise in the room and loud noises outside.  When I record now, I have to put pillows on top of the computer to silence the fan noise.  Now I need to look into finding a new, quieter case for the computer.

Offline MattGSX

  • Whiny Music Nerd
  • Senior PLA Junkie
  • *****
  • Posts: 1195
  • 1337 13V3L: +59/-97
  • Douchenozzle
    • Matt GSX Has Better Taste In Music Than You
Re: Condenser Microphones & What Mic do you use?
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2008, 03:07:33 PM »
I've used a bunch of different mikes. When recording on a computer (with no external mixer), I generally use a Sony digital recording mic. I can't remember the model # right now, but it has the 3.5mm plug on the end, so it's already ready to go into the computer. This is usually what I'll do for my personal recording projects.

At school, however, I have a full studio to play with, so my options are a bit better. There, I'll generally use a Shure SM58 for vocals, and I'll play around with different stuff for instrumental. I'm not really allowed the top end, since I'm not actually a recording student.

For recommendations - If you're looking on the mid- higher end, I've always liked the SM series for Shure. The SM57 has better shock mounting, but the pop filter isn't as great (you'll just need a new pop filter). It is uni-directional, though, which can be very nice if you're in a noisy or busy environment (computer, florescent light, furnace, fridge, etc). The SM58 is a bit warmer and has a better pop filter, but I've broken a few of these because of bad shockmounting. they're also multi-directional, which can cause background noise problems, but it does increase the depth of whatever is being recorded.

On the mid-end, Behringer makes a nice line of multi-purpose mics for $29-$69. Anything unidirectional with a wide base, shock mounting, and a decent pop filter will work well for vocals. If you want the full depth of your voice, get a multi-directional mic and just find a way to silence your environment. Sony also makes a great line of digital recording mics with PCs and Minidisc recorders in mind, but most of these mics require the device to supply power through the audio jack. As far as I know, this can only be done with certain Minidisc recorders. If you're laying vocals on existing tracks, this really isn't an option, but it's actually a nice way to record acoustic music, as well as live performances.